Budget-conscious way to increase media exposure: Get quoted and Help A Reporter Out

Looking to get your company in the news more often? 

No, not for causing the next salmonella outbreak. You want to help your company get some positive recognition. Thought leadership on topical issues helps distinguish executives and companies with key publics.

But you don't have the budget for a PR agency to pitch for you.

Start small and increasingly aim higher. You begin by having an interesting or provocative point of view on an issue that people care about. (Have something to say.) This is different from shilling a new product offering. 

Once you have something to say, work hard at saying it in a way anyone can understand it. Write an op-ed for your local paper or your industry rag. Offer an exec up for a segment on local talk radio. You will quickly cultivate a list of reporters and producers who have space and time to fill who will take your calls and be glad they did. And maybe you can go national.

Ok, this does involve a fair amount of work and time. But perhaps worth it if you want to stand apart from your competition.

Meanwhile, here's a simple and free way to play in stories about your industry, assuming you are acccesible, nimble and can write clearly. It comes courtesy of technology blog Force of Good (not affiliated with Force for Good other than we share high ideals):

Sign up someone in your department (maybe you) with the free service Help a Reporter Out to receive frequent emails featuring a list of requests by journalists looking for a quick answer or quote that will help them advance or finish a story.

Make sure you respond quickly and only to requests in which your exec, company or product is a good fit for the journalist's inquiry. (Yes, you will be kicked off if you try to spin your way into a story you don't belong.)

You will be helping a reporter out while getting your company some free exposure. What's not to like about that?

- Jon Harmon

Comments

  1. Mark says:

    I agree. HARO is fantastic.
    Although direct product pitches are usually not welcome, the reporters tend to love a great “back story”, especially ones that relate to their particular niche.
    There are SO many requests each day that you can be very choosy with what you respond to (at FlipScript, we only reply to about 3 a week), but they are guaranteed to be a good fit that way.

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