Jet Blue Finally Responds

http://www.hypehoodie.com/financial-statement-analysis-assignment/ financial statement analysis assignment Back in February I wrote a post here praising JetBlue for its strong crisis response aimed at recovering from a week in which the airline had alienated its customers and badly tarnished its reputation for superior customer service.

writing help nyc One of Force for Good’s regular readers, a pilot for another airline, was skeptical of JetBlue’s commitment to enact real change to address core issues, especially very tighlty scheduled flight crews and ground operations people, leaving no margin for predictable weather-related delay.

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research paper topics medicine So I asked JetBlue to answer the questions posed in the reader comment and asked the airline’s media relations to detail specific reforms enacted to address core issues leading to flight cancellations. Time passed and I repeated the inquiry, but still there was no response from JetBlue. So earlier this week, I wrote another post about the airline, detailing the lack of response to legitimate questions. That followup post caught the airline’s attention, prompting this email which I include in its entirety:

http://plumberreview.com.au/how-to-write-a-business-action-plan/ how to write a business action plan Please accept my apologies for the delay you faced in receiving a reply to your inquiry. In response to your reader’s question about what JetBlue is doing these days, let me give you an update – and clarify your statement that JetBlue “shut down” in the aftermath of the Valentine’s Day storm. Over the course of six days, we cancelled about 1,000 flights, or 1/3 of our schedule, but did not shut down.

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help thesis statement research paper On Valentine’s Day, as you know, the northeast was socked with an incredible ice storm. Several forecasts suggested that the icing conditions would convert to rain and/or snow early in the morning, so we planned our operation for that opportunity.  On Valentine’s Day we did what we thought was the right thing for our customers. We cancelled only a handful of flights based on forecasts that provided various windows of opportunity—breaks in the weather—to get flights off the ground. We have always believed that customers would rather get to their destination late than never, and we were relying on those forecasted breaks to get our customers out. We got into a situation where planes had been pushed off the gate and were deiced and ready to go. They were just waiting for those breaks in the weather, which ever ended up coming. At the same time, we had plans still landing at JFK from across the country, creating an imbalance in our system. We had too many planes on the ground and not enough gates for them to park at, so a handful of flights (nine, to be exact) sat for excessive amounts of time before being deplaned.

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Eating Disorders Essay In the days after the storm, problems progressed because we had not canceled flights early enough or deep enough. We were in a situation where we had dozens of planes out of place and hundreds of pilots and inflight crewmembers out of place, too. An airline in a storm like this one is like a big jigsaw puzzle that’s been thrown up in the air. The pieces are difficult to put back together. We needed to reset our operation by cancelling a portion of it, which allowed crewmembers to get their FAA-mandated rest time, and allowed us to reposition our aircraft in the cities where they were needed for a successful return to service.

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follow It took us six days to recover from the Valentine’s Day ice storm. That is just unacceptable. Customers understand why their flight is cancelled or delayed during a storm. They even understand when the operation is upset the day following a storm. But day three? Forget it.

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http://collinedesionvaudemont.fr/fairleigh-dickinson-university-admissions-essay/ saxon phonics homework help We launched our Customer Bill of Rights the week after the storm. No other airline comes close to being as obsessive about customer service as we do. That’s why we created the Bill of Rights, which provides real compensation to customers inconvenienced when flights are cancelled or delayed. It’s our way of letting customers know that they can count on us, even in many situations that are beyond the control of our airline. It’s our way of saying, ‘We screwed up. We want to make it right. So we’re putting our money where out mouth is.’

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http://www.jsira.com/affordable-thesis-writing-services.html We’ve also done a lot more work internally, to make sure our processes and tools are up to par.  After the Valentine’s Day storm, we faced two other powerful weather systems. In the first, we got creative and instead of cancelling flights from places like Buffalo and Rochester, N.Y., that were bound for JFK and booked full of people with connections down to Florida, we simply rerouted them straight to Florida, and customers got their early. Our system operations crewmembers won a lot of points with Upstate travelers that day for putting them first, but it was really all in a day’s work for them. It’s that kind of thinking that needs to thrive at JetBlue, and that we’re getting back to.

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http://rockexim.com/essay-done-online/ After another storm hit on Friday, March 16, we were able to declare victory over the weather. We strategically pre-cancelled flights so planes and crews would be in the right places and we could have a smooth start-up when the storm passed. We may have been first out of the gate with cancellations, but we were also the first airline to really get back to flying in New York when the storm passed. We were running 98% of our flights when other airlines were still cancelled through noon. In response to the statement that “no one has ever had to shut down for several days,” 1) JetBlue has never shut down, and 2) during the most recent ice storm, other airlines unfortunately faced the situation where there operations were disrupted and needed days to recover.

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see While that in no way minimizes the inconvenience that faced JetBlue Customers in February, it does illustrate the challenges of winter operations that face all airlines, especially those with a large presence in the northeastern U.S. Hope this answers your reader’s question.

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